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U-40 Insulin Syringes

Disposable insulin syringe designed to be used with Vetsulin

Species: Dog Cat
Prescription required
FREE shipping over $49
Ships Free!

U-40 Insulin Syringes

Disposable insulin syringe designed to be used with Vetsulin

Species: Dog Cat
Prescription required
FREE shipping over $49
Ships Free!
Product images:

Product description

Diabetes is a disorder of the pancreas characterized by insufficient or no production of insulin and high blood sugar. Insulin is produced by the pancreas to reduce blood sugar levels by moving the sugar into the cells after eating, so it can be used for energy. Healthy cats and dogs can produce all the insulin they need on their own. But cats or dogs with diabetes have to get insulin another way: through injections. With U-40 Insulin Syringes combined with Vetsulin 10 ml or Vetsulin 2.7 ml, you can help control your pet's glucose levels and alleviate the unpleasant symptoms of diabetes. These single-use syringes are completely sterile, nonpyrogenic, and non-toxic. Each box comes with 100 needles.

Indications for use

Vetsulin U-40 Insulin Syringes are used with Vetsulin 10 ml or Vetsulin 2.7 ml to help control your pet's glucose levels and alleviate the unpleasant symptoms of diabetes.

Administration and dosage

FOR SUBCUTANEOUS INJECTION IN DOGS AND CATS ONLY

Vials:

USE OF A SYRINGE OTHER THAN A U-40 SYRINGE WILL RESULT IN INCORRECT DOSING.

Shake the vial thoroughly until a homogeneous, uniformly milky suspension is obtained. Foam on the surface of the suspension formed during shaking should be allowed to disperse before the product is used and, if required, the product should be gently mixed to maintain a homogeneous, uniformly milky suspension before use. Clumps or white particles can form in insulin suspensions: do not use the product if visible clumps or white particles persist after shaking thoroughly.

Cartridges:

VETSULIN CARTRIDGES SHOULD BE USED EXCLUSIVELY WITH VETPEN AND 29G/12 MM PEN NEEDLES. Prior to loading vetsulin cartridges, shake the cartridge until a homogeneous, uniformly milky suspension is obtained. Clumps or white particles can form in insulin suspensions: do not use the product if visible clumps or white particles persist after shaking.

The detailed instructions for use provided with VetPen should be strictly followed.

The injection should be administered subcutaneously, 2 to 5 cm (3/4 to 2 in) from the dorsal midline, varying from behind the scapulae to the mid-lumbar region and alternating sides.

Always provide the Owner Information Sheet with each prescription.

Dogs:

The initial recommended vetsulin dose is 0.5 IU insulin/kg body weight. Initially, this dose should be given once daily concurrently with, or right after a meal.

Twice daily therapy should be initiated if the duration of insulin action is determined to be inadequate. If twice daily treatment is initiated, the two doses should each be 25% less than the once daily dose required to attain an acceptable nadir. For example, if a dog receiving 20 units of vetsulin once daily has an acceptable nadir but inadequate duration of activity, the vetsulin dose should be changed to 15 units twice daily.

The veterinarian should re-evaluate the dog at appropriate intervals and adjust the dose based on clinical signs, urinalysis results, and glucose curve values until adequate glycemic control has been attained. Further adjustments in dosage may be necessary with changes in the dog’s diet, body weight, or concomitant medication, or if the dog develops concurrent infection, inflammation, neoplasia, or an additional endocrine or other medical disorder.

Cats:

The initial recommended dose in cats is 1 to 2 IU per injection. The injections should be given twice daily at approximately 12 hour intervals. For cats fed twice daily, the injections should be given concurrently with, or right after each meal. For cats fed ad libitum, no change in feeding schedule is needed.

The veterinarian should re-evaluate the cat at appropriate intervals and adjust the dose based on clinical signs, urinalysis results, and glucose curve values until adequate glycemic control has been attained. Further adjustments in dosage may be necessary with changes in the cat’s diet, body weight, or concomitant medication, or if the cat develops concurrent infection, inflammation, neoplasia, or an additional endocrine or other medical disorder